Bird Treks - A Quality Birdwatching Tour Company

Bird Watching Photos - Montauk Point

     
Photo Montauk Point, the very eastern tip of the south fork of Long Island, New York.
Photo by Tom Amico, tour participant
Green Herons nest and feed near fresh water.
Photo by Carl & Nancy Juris
Photo
Photo Snowy Egrets are to be expected in coastal marshes and ponds.
Photo by Dick Scribner
Little Blue Herons prefer much the same habitats as Snowy Egrets.
Photo by Les Eastman
Photo
Photo Spotted Sandpiper is a common locally nesting shorebird.
Photo by Dennis Small
Black-bellied Plover will be migrating north, perhaps to Churchill Manitoba.
Photo by Les Eastman
Photo
Photo Another northbound migrant is Red Knot, a species in serious decline.
Photo by Mr. Trombley
The American Oystercatcher is big and showy.
Photo by Bob Schutsky, tour leader
Photo
Photo This tour is in prime time and location for the rare and beautifully plumaged Curlew Sandpiper.
Photo by Tom Amico, tour participant
Greater Yellowlegs will be heading to its Arctic breeding grounds.
Photo by Tom Amico, tour participant
Photo
Photo Black Skimmer is a unique and graceful tern.
Photo by Judy Schneider, tour participant
We'll watch for Forster's Terns feeding over open water.
Photo by John Puschock
Photo
Photo Royal Terns often associate with other tern species, perhaps roosting on a beach or mudflat.
Photo by Tom Amico, tour participant
A common nesting bird on Long Island, Ospreys frequently nest on man-made platforms.
Photo by Tom Amico, tour participant
Photo
Photo Marsh Wren is the bubbling songster of cattail marshes, where it nests.
Photo by Tom Amico, tour participant
We'll search hedgerows and thickets for nesting White-eyed Vireos.
Photo by Barry Ulman, tour participant
Photo
Photo Willow Flycatcher should be found in much the same habitat, perhaps a bit wetter.
Photo by Tom Amico, tour participant
Yellow Warbler is almost certainly to be found nearby.
Photo by Meredith Lombard
Photo
Photo A likely migrant songbird is the Tennessee Warbler.
Photo by Rick Greenspun
The colorful Baltimore Oriole is a common migrant and local breeder.
Photo by Steve Dale
Photo
Back to Previous Page