Bird Treks - A Quality Birdwatching Tour Company

Bird Watching Photos - Churchill

     
Photo Ross's Gull is one of the most highly sought-after species at Churchill. We have found it on all of our tours, except one.
Photo by John Puschock
The tundra surrounding Churchill hosts a good breeding population of Smith's Longspurs.
Photo by Bob Schutsky
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Photo Some years we find large flocks of Lapland Longspurs in migration, often feeding on spilled grain at the granary.
Photo by Les Eastman
Snow Buntings often associate with the Lapland Longspurs.
Photo by Les Eastman
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Photo A magnificent Black-bellied Plover in full breeding plumage.
Photo by Les Eastman
Pacific Loons nest on the many ponds near Churchill.
Photo by Les Eastman
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Photo We sometimes hear an American Bittern giving its wild 'thunder-pumping' call.
Photo by Les Eastman
Pine Grosbeak is a regular at the local feeding stations, like this female.
Photo by Les Eastman
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Photo The mouth of the Churchill River from Cape Merry, as it empties into Hudson Bay, offers a great vantage point.
Photo by Les Eastman
Two male Common Eiders fly past the mouth of the Churchill River.
Photo by Rick Greenspun
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Photo It's nice to see and hear breeding American Tree Sparrows at Churchill.
Photo by Tom Amico
Wilson's Snipe are often found winnowing over their wetland habitat.
Photo by Tom Amico
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Photo Bohemian Waxwing is always a good find.
Photo by John Puschock
Whimbrel is one of the many nesting shorebird species at Churchill.
Photo by John Puschock
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Photo Spruce Grouse can be amazingly tame.
Photo by James Leupold
An intriguing Inuit stone structure, the inukshuk, can be seen in the town of Churchill. The inukshuk stands for the importance of friendship and reminds us of our dependence on one another.
Photo by Kim Schutsky
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Photo Sunset comes late in the day this far north on our June tour.
Photo by Kim Schutsky
Everything changes when the thaw comes to the Churchill River.
Photo by Kim Schutsky
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Photo If conditions allow, we venture out into Hudson Bay in Zodiacs.
Photo by Mary Brenner
We sometimes hear Northern Hawk Owls giving their territorial calls.
Photo by Rick Greenspun
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Photo A big favorite at Churchill is the Willow Ptarmigan, just beginning to change into its summer breeding plumage.
Photo by Rick Greenspun
The attractive and acrobatic Merlin nests in the spruce forests.
Photo by Rick Greenspun
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Photo Arctic Tern is the common nesting tern at Churchill. It is actually the only tern found there.
Photo by Rick Greenspun
We find Boreal Chickadees at a Churchill feeding station, and on the southern part of the tour at Riding Mountain.
Photo by Rick Greenspun
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Photo Swainson's Hawk nests on the southern prairies.
Photo by Barry Ulman
Burrowing Owl is another prairie breeding bird.
Photo by John Puschock
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Photo One of the big specialties at Riding Mountain is the elusive Great Gray Owl.
Photo by John Puschock
It's always fun to watch Wilson's Phalaropes as they spin and feed.
Photo by David Nelson
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Photo Western Grebe is known for its dramatic courtship dances.
Photo by Rick Greenspun
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