Bird Treks - A Quality Birdwatching Tour Company

Bird Watching Photos - SOUTH FLORIDA, EVERGLADES NATIONAL PARK,

     
Photo The unique Anhinga is an Everglades specialty.
Photo by Bob Schutsky
We hope to find Painted Bunting on the Dry Tortugas.
Photo by Barry Ulman
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Photo A colorful Yellow-throated Warbler, feeding in an air plant on a Live Oak.
Photo by Barry Ulman
Common Gallinule is a bird of the freshwater wetlands. Until recently this species was known as Common Moorhen.
Photo by Bob Coley
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Photo We will see almost all of the long-legged waders, including Tricolored Heron.
Photo by Bob Coley
Brown Boobies like to perch on the navigational markers near the Dry Tortugas.
Photo by David Nelson
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Photo There is a large nesting colony of Brown Noddies in the Tortugas.
Photo by David Nelson
Another migrant songbird that we hope to see is Kentucky Warbler.
Photo by Dick Scribner
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Photo American White Pelicans are always a pleasure to see.
Photo by John Puschock
The more common Brown Pelican is abundant along the coast.
Photo by Tom Amico
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There are a few locations where we may find a wintering Scissor-tailed Flycatcher.
Photo by Paul Miller
Photo Yellow-crowned Night-Herons feed mostly on crabs.
Photo by Steve Dale
Great Egrets are common in almost any wetland habitat.
Photo by Tom Amico
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Photo Gray Kingbird is a South Florida specialty.
Photo by Tom Amico
A common winter and breeding raptor throughout South Florida, the Osprey.
Photo by Tom Amico
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Photo Sandwich Terns have a long, black bill with a yellow tip.
Photo by Tom Amico
We typically find Piping Plover along the Gulf Coast, perhaps in close company with Wilson's and Snowy Plovers.
Photo by Tom Amico
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Photo Palm Warbler is a common winter resident and migrant. It spends a lot of time on the ground, bobbing its tail as it feeds.
Photo by Tom Amico
The Nine-banded Armadillo is a nearly hairless mammal.
Photo by Barry Ulman
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Photo Late April is egg laying time for the Florida Spiny Softshell.
Photo by Dick Scribner
They grow some BIG alligators in South Florida.
Photo by Judy Schneider
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An Anole displays its colorful dewlap. What female Anole could possibly resist THAT?
Photo by Les Eastman
Photo There is a good chance of finding Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks in the vast South Florida wetlands.
Photo by Les Eastman
A Cattle Egret in full breeding plumage.
Photo by Les Eastman
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Photo The Limpkin feeds almost exclusively on Apple Snails.
Photo by Les Eastman
A study in grace and beauty - - the Swallow-tailed Kite.
Photo by Les Eastman
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Photo Wood Storks nest at National Audubon's Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary.
Photo by Les Eastman
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