Bird Treks - A Quality Birdwatching Tour Company

Birding Around the World 20 Years

Bird Watching Photos - SOUTHEAST ARIZONA

     
The following are some of the highlights of our July-August Southeast Arizona Tour. They are categorized by habitat and altitude, from the desert and grasslands, through the foothills and oak-juniper habitat, into the high mountain areas of Ponderosa pine at 10,000 feet.
Photo Saguaro National Forest, a forest of cacti, on the outskirts of Tucson.
Photo by Lenore Gifford, tour participant
This Bobcat was within the Tucson city limits at the Sweetwater Wetlands Area.
Photo by Paul Kunstek, tour participant
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Photo We once found this juvenile Purple Gallinule in the same wetlands, an exceedingly rare find in Arizona.
Photo by Jim Hays
Willcox Twin Lakes, an oasis in the middle of the desert.
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Photo We expect Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks, but the Roseate Spoonbill was the first for Arizona in 23 years.
Photo By bob Schutsky, tour leader
A common migrant at Willcox is the Wilson's Phalarope. We sometimes see hundreds, spinning and feeding in the water.
Photo by David Nelson
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Photo We may find a Western Grebe, especially at Patagonia Lake State Park.
Photo by John Puschock, tour leader
We had a good look at this Regal Horned Lizard on the way into California Gulch.
Photo by Debra Marsh, tour participant
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Photo Swainson's Hawk has a striking under-wing pattern.
Photo by Barry Ulman, tour participant
Burrowing Owls are mostly diurnal, making them much easier to see during the day.
Photo by John Puschock, tour leader
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Photo Barn Owls are sometimes found in old buildings or groves of trees in open areas.
Photo by Jim & Deva Burns/NATURAL IMPACTS
A male Blue Grosbeak with its rusty shoulder patches and silvery over-sized bill.
Photo by Tom Amico, tour participant
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Photo The full orange hood gives the Hooded Oriole its name. Most orioles have black hoods.
Photo by Barry Ulman, tour participant
Yellow Warblers breed in riparian habitat such as Sonoita Creek.
Photo by Meredith Lombard
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A nice flock of Lazuli Buntings.
Photo by Lenore Gifford, tour participant
Photo Mexican Jay is a common denizen of the oak-juniper habitat.
Photo by Bob Coley, tour participant
Acorn Woodpeckers are vocal and easy to observe. They frequently feed at sugar water feeders.
Photo by Tom Amico, tour participant
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Photo One of the real prizes of any Southeast Arizona tour is a Montezuma Quail.
Photo by David Schutsky, co-leader
Hummingbirds are always popular. We typically find 12-14 species on our July tours. These include such gems as Costa's Hummingbird . . .
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Photo . . . the rare and local Violet-crowned Hummingbird . . .
Photo by Tom Amico
. . . migrant Anna's Hummingbird . . .
Photo by John McNamara
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Photo . . . Broad-tailed Hummer . . .
Photo by John McNamara
. . . Magnificent Hummer . . .
Photo by John McNamara
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Photo . . . the striking White-eared Hummer . . .
Photo by John McNamara
. . . and a female Black-chinned Hummingbird, this one with a very large nestling in her lichen-covered nest.
Photo by Paul Miller, tour participant
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Photo Elegant Trogon is a prized cavity nesting specialty of southeast Arizona, its only breeding area in the US.
Photo by Paul Kunstek, tour participant
Arizona Woodpecker is a good find.
Photo by Mary Brenner, tour participant
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Photo There are migrant Western Tanagers in many different habitats.
Photo by Mary Brenner, tour participant
Flame-colored Tanager is a rare species. It lives mostly south of the border in Mexico and central America. This one nested for several consecutive years in Madera Canyon.
Photo by Jerome Smith
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Photo Even more unusual was this Aztec Thrush in Madera Canyon. It is a Mexican endemic.
Photo by John Puschock, tour leader
A young Spotted Owl on a day roost in famed Sheelite Canyon.
Photo by David Schutsky, co-leader
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Photo Steller's Jay is a noisy highland species.
Photo by Lenore Gifford, tour participant
Another highland specialty if the diminutive Buff-breasted Flycatcher.
Photo by Walt DeBill, tour participant
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Photo One location is more beautiful than the next.
Photo by Bob Coley, tour participant
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